I was playing some music with a few friends just now, and realized (again, not for the first time) that just about every song we play is in 4/4 timing (and most of the others in 3/4). I thought “Well that’s kinda boring!” and then realized that their just might be a reason or two for that.

1. 4/4 is the easiest to play. The nature of most worship teams is that you have all levels of musicianship in one room. You have to account for people on the team who haven’t advanced as far as others when choosing a song to play. I have blogged about this a few times.

2. It is the easiest for others to listen to. In North America, this timing is prevalent in most of our music. It is what we are used to. Because of that, people can more easily sing along with and understand what the band is doing. If we all of a sudden threw something like 5/4 timing in there, we might have some confusion, even assuming that the whole band can play it.

Obviously, this is a generalization. There are some churches who throw in oddball meters all the time, but most do not. Most churches do not have a band that plays on the professional or recording level, so it just isn’t that common. This post is merely an observation, but think about it. Does your team dare step out of the box and try something a little different?

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